Skiing v Snowboarding Injuries
Started by Mark203 in Ski Chatter - 16 Replies
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Feb-2010
Mark203
Pointed out to my cousin who has just switched from skis to snowboarding and hurt herself, that snowboarding is far more dangerous then skiing. She thinks not!

Googled for a while, did not come up with much, anyone got figures and what type of injury are most common
Feb-2010
Juddernaut
Snowboarders injure more skiers than skiers injure snowboarders
Feb-2010
Trencher
geno68 wrote:Snowboarders injure more skiers than skiers inkure snowboarders


Considering that I have been hit from up hill by four skiers, and no snowboarders, My experience is very different from your's.

I think a better way to look at it is, that you are more likely to be hit by younger people.

As far as snowboard injuries go, if snowboarding is more popular with younger people, then you might expect more injuries from a group that that is less risk adverse, and has not fully developed reasoning, and judgment. I both ski and board, and don't think there is a lot of difference in the risk, based on the many falls I have had.

In terms of which injuries are worse, the predominance of leg, and especially knee injuries among skiers, is something that should be noted.

Trencher
Feb-2010
Peakmonster
Usually wrist and lower back injuries are typical me thinks with boarding.
Personally dont like both my legs strapped to one board.
Oh and bieng hit by skiers as boarders just sit/fall down just after the brow of hills where they cannot be seen.

http://www.ski-injury.com/specific-injuries/wrist
Feb-2010
Ian Wickham
Trencher wrote:
geno68 wrote:Snowboarders injure more skiers than skiers inkure snowboarders


Considering that I have been hit from up hill by four skiers, and no snowboarders, My experience is very different from your's.

I think a better way to look at it is, that you are more likely to be hit by younger people.

As far as snowboard injuries go, if snowboarding is more popular with younger people, then you might expect more injuries from a group that that is less risk adverse, and has not fully developed reasoning, and judgment. I both ski and board, and don't think there is a lot of difference in the risk, based on the many falls I have had.

In terms of which injuries are worse, the predominance of leg, and especially knee injuries among skiers, is something that should be noted.

Trencher


It is all down to the individual experience but my wife was nearly hit this year and guess what it was not skier, my opinion is if they hit me they better make a good job of it
because if they don't you might see the first headless snowboarder
Feb-2010
Andy A
mark203 - what've you got against snowboarding ? I don't think there's any evidence of one being more injury-prone than the other
It probably depends on how hard you ski/ride, and how hard and fast you push with both of them.

geno68 - where did you get the info for your statement ? Any hard facts ?

Trencher - I kind of know what you're saying, but after being taken out on my last trip in January by a 50+ year old Italian skier who cut across the front of me at speed without looking upslope and despite me being a good 6-7m away from him, I do disagree slightly; bad slope etiquette
is bad slope etiquette whether done by a skier or snowboarder

Peakmonster - skiers AND snowboarders stop just over the brows of downslopes where they can't be seen - the fact is they're all idiots who do this

"Wickers" -I guess by the crass comment you're a skier then ? And what happens if a skier crashes into you ? Will we see a headless skier then ?

and if anyone was wondering, yes, i'm a snowboarder (who doesn't crash into people OR stop where he can't be seen)
Feb-2010
Mark203
Andy A wrote:mark203 - what've you got against snowboarding ? I don't think there's any evidence of one being more injury-prone than the other
It probably depends on how hard you ski/ride, and how hard and fast you push with both of them.



Andy I have nothing against snowboarding

I know that ski injuries have declined by 50% dur to release bindings and ski brakes since the 70s. Snowboards have neither of these so logic kind of tells me that if you fall over with both legs strapped to a board you are more likely to hurt yourself.

according to the internet

10% of ski accidents result from a collision with another person or object, 5% are lift related and 5% occur as the result of equipment failure

on snowboards forearm and shoulder injuries are most common 60%, followed by shoulder, then lower leg and head injuries

The risk of dying is 0.7 deaths per million skier visits, and 0.46 deaths per million for snowboarders.


The risk of death or injury

1 death in 1,000,000 days' skiing is the fatality rate for winter board sports.

In these terms, canoeing (1 fatality in every 750,000 trips) is worse - and scuba diving is five times as risky.

2.8 injuries per 1,000 days spent skiing or snowboarding is the injury rate and it compares badly with that of other sports. Parachutists, for instance, may be ten times more likely to die with each jump than skiers are with each day spent at Val d'Isère but, assuming they survive, they are two thirds less likely to be hurt.

365 is the average number of consecutive days you would have to be skiing or snowboarding before experiencing a reportable injury. If you spent the same time playing rugby, the chances are that you would not still be playing by the end of the year.

67,000 rugby injuries require a trip to Accident and Emergency in the UK every year, and studies of competitive rugby players have found there is one injury per person for every ten games played - or around two injuries per match. That rate makes rugby a more dangerous sport than boxing, mountain climbing and even - for those feeling patriotic - American football.

1 death in 8,200 pregnancies.

If all these statistics encourage a little risk aversion, then it is worth considering that by that logic we might as well stop being human beings - quite literally. Giving birth carries a greater risk of fatality than any sport.

Sources: Health and Safety Executive, Rospa, National Ski Area Association, British Parachuting Association, Ski-Injury.com, Sportsmed, ABC

PS this I found funny - Parachutists, for instance, may be ten times more likely to die with each jump than skiers are with each day spent at Val d'Isère but, assuming they survive, they are two thirds less likely to be hurt.


Feb-2010
Andy A
lmao, thanks for that useful insight into the stat's, Mark.

i'll feel safer now when i'm out riding... ...i think

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